Oakland Rotary News

Jon and Gudrun Traveling the Trails

Gudrun ...Just blazing the way!!!! Anyone see Jon!!!

Hiking the North Yorkshire Moors in rain

Hiking the North Yorkshire Moors in rain and wind!

Putting the new Osprey Gortex gear to the ultimate test and it passed 100% Quite amazing to be warm, comfortable and smiling!!!

The heather is spectacular, as far as you can see in all directions.

We are warm, dry and settling in at the Buck Inn Hotel, Chop Gate, for the night. We have three more days of hiking, plus a two day layover to ride the steam trains and we will arrive at Robin Hood's Bay! Quite a hike!!!

Fellow Rotarians on the trail!

Rotary Club of Keswick

8/7/2019

Met a group of hiking Rotarians today on the trail between Orton and Kirkby Stephen.

Spotted the Rotary Club of Keswick on one guys shirt! We had a great chat and fun joking about a make-up meeting for us!

Added to the enjoyment of the day.

A 13 mile day we are over 90 miles in the last 7 days

  • Ten days and 131 miles under our belts!
  • Sun, rain, mud, bogs and great B&B’s
  • Tea along the trail, sometimes in a tea room and sometimes trail side
  • . With a bath or shower, dinner and a good nights sleep we are revived and ready for the next day’s hike

At our meeting on July 25, 2019, Karen Friedman introduced our speaker, Dr. Joshua Bamberger, who is currently serving (in addition to his medical practice) as the Assistant Director of UCSF Benioff Homelessness and Housing Initiative. A specialist in exploring the causes and remedies to homelessness in the Bay Area, Dr. Bamberger gave a thoughtful and informative presentation on the important subject to us today.

Oakland has one of the biggest homeless populations in the area, and it has risen by 47% in the past two years here. He pinpointed homeless causes of incarceration, mental illness and alcoholism, but by far the main root cause is lack of affordable housing. Fifty percent of the homeless over 50 years old were not homeless until that age, but were unable to remain in their homes, ending up on the street.

The major solution over time is providing more affordable housing, which has been woefully under built for the demand. It will not completely solve the homeless problem, but at least will get people off the streets and out of shelters and temporary housing like safe-sheds, seeing those as “emergency room” temporary solutions. Homelessness is certainly a major issue here in Oakland, and his remarks were topical and informative.

Dr. Bamberger’s presentation may be seen on the live stream video of the July 25th meeting at http://bit.ly/BambergerRCO

At our Club lunch meeting on July 18, Wendy Howard introduced Ashley Pritchard, a former Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar, who shared her fascinating work in Myanmar.

While working at United Nations headquarters in New York, she first learned about the Ambassadorial Scholarship program, funded by The Rotary Foundation.  Over 40,000 scholars from 100 nations received Ambassadorial Scholarships between 1948 and 2012. She received her Master of Arts in International Development from Chulalongkorn University in Thailand. As a result, she was sent to Myanmar where she worked on the historic 2015 election to allow the country to transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. 

She described Myanmar: it has the 25th largest population in the world;90% of the people are Buddist; there are over 135 recognized ethnic groups; and it is a very poor agrarian society.  The Internet does not exist, and communication is very difficult.

The election was expected to bring out 40% of the voters, but 70% turned out instead.  Following the election, she influenced, drafted or revised more than 15 national policies. The laws had not been changed since British colonial rule ended some 50 years earlier.   She worked with a company to draft a new human rights policy, providing labor rights to workers.  Now, more than 175 companies have joined the first company in instituting human rights policies.

She helped manage a refugee camp for several hundred thousand persecuted ethnic Rohingya people after Myanmar rejected their citizenship.  They were forced to flee primarily to Bangladesh.

She thanked Rotary for its many projects underway globally.

Upon her conclusion, the audience gave her a well-deserved standing ovation. After the meeting, some members said that it was the best presentation they’ve ever seen at a Rotary meeting! For those who couldn’t make the meeting, you may view her presentation at

http://bit.ly/PritchardatRCO

Cycling from Fairfax to Point Reyes Station

 

On Saturday, July 20, The High Adventure cycled from Fairfax to Point Reyes Station and back.  The weather and road conditions were fabulous.  The traffic conditions were minimal and those cars encountered yielded the road. 

A short lay over at Point Reyes Station provided time for lunch and the Farmers Market.

Total distance: 39.66 miles

Elevation Gain : 2257

Time 3h 18 min 

 

 

                                   Image result for cycling to point reyes station

Saturday July 20th     9:00 AM 

 

Saturday, July 20, The High Adventure is going to cycle from Fairfax to Point Reyes Station and back 

We will meet at 9:00 a.m. at the "Fairfax Coffee Roastery" in Fairfax located at 4 Bolinas Rd., the corner of Bolinas Rd. and Broadway.  

 

The ride will be the scenic route along Sir Francis Drake Blvd. West to Olema at Hwy. 1, Shoreline Hwy, then North to Pt. Reyes Station.  This route will skip a much longer, hillier route along Bolinas Road, which turns into Fairfax Bolinas Rd, out to Hwy 1 in Bolinas, 11.2 miles south of Olema.  

- Once we get to Olema at Shoreline Hwy we will continue 2.4 miles, mostly flat, North to Point Reyes Station.

Remember all High Adventure Events are open to all. We encourage that friends and family members be extended invitations

If you are planning or thinking you may attend please email me at       Highadventure@outlook.com 

 

High Adventure of the Oakland Rotary #3 

Upcoming Events 

July 20, 2019               Cycling Point Reyes Station       9:00 A.M to 2:00 P.M                Cost: Free

August 01, 2019          Family Picnic                              5:30 P.M. to 7:45 P.M.               Cost: $21.00 per person  Children under 12 free

August 25, 2019          A's Vs Giants                              11:00 A.M  Tailgate                    Cost: $50.00 includes ticket to game

September 15, 2019   Kayaking - Elkhorn   8:30 A.M to 12:00 P.M         Cost: Free (Guide) plus cost of Rental 

October 12, 2019        Asti Tour De Vine      Cycling                              Cost: http://www.astitourdevine.com/

          

 

 

What Our Students Said About Enterprise Institute

I don't think I've ever been more challenged with teamwork before.

OMG Great! [food]

A great learning experience in presenting in front of a large crowd.

I really liked how we were pushed out of our comfort zone and were demonstrated the importance of talking and socializing with people you don't know.

I am most proud of the improvement in my presentation skills (speaking to large groups).

Not only have I learned from Rotarians, I was able to learn from other groups and how to think differently.

Food was AMAZING!

Thanks for having me!

I've learned a good amount from my peer counselor and we've created a caring bond.

I've had an amazing time learning and meeting new people.

Judges were very considerate yet honest feedback after presentations and it did not feel intimidating talking with them.

Loved it - was a great experience.

A big...BIG learning experience! Judges were cool!

I love all the Rotarians--super engaging/supportive.

I had a good time!

Hella good food.

The overall program was fun and I learned a lot.

10/10.

LOVED ALL OF THIS (even the blackout)

Moonlight Kayaking from Jack London Square will return this fall

The date if the event has not been set.  

Being on the water and viewing the Oakland skyline with the full moon in the sky is an overwhelming experience 

To put in another way "Moonlight paddling is enchanting!"

The water is calm and glassy on the Oakland Estuary and the city lights add to the ambiance.

The kayaking is at a leisurely pace as the sun sets and the moon rises, illuminating a delightful evening. 

For more information Contact Mark Rosen 
mrosen@info-gate.com

Kayaking will be followed by those desiring to continue the merriment at a local eatery.
Place to be determined prior to the event!
About Moonlight Kayaking From Jack London Square 

Goal: Enjoy a leisurely kayak cruise under the moonlight on the Oakland Estuary off Jack London Square.

Prerequisite: Novices must paddle in a double kayak with an experienced friend.
The minimum age for Moonlight Kayaking is 14 years; children under 18 years must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

Duration of program: 3 hours

Time on the water: Approximately 2 hours

Note: Good physical condition is required to ensure an enjoyable class. If you are not sure about your abilities to participate in this activity, please call our California Kayak's Program Office at 800-366-9804.

Paddling under the moonlight is an enchanting experience! The water is usually calm and glassy on the Oakland Estuary in the evening, and the city lights add to the romance. We'll enjoy a leisurely pace as the sun goes down, and the moonrise sets the stage for a beautiful trip. Weather depending, we'll paddle out around Government Island, or towards the mouth of the Oakland Estuary. You stay warm and dry in our cozy sea kayaks, too. You can introduce a friend to moonlight kayaking by paddling together in one of our stable doubles.

California Kayak's enthusiastic staff will give a brief orientation to the equipment and strokes, then guide you on a tour of the area. During the trip, we'll "raft up" the kayaks and drift under the moonlight while enjoying the sounds of the city!

“Rotary Club of Oakland Visits the Oakland Zoo”

On June 6, 2019, the Rotary Club of Oakland enjoyed a special evening with Rotary member, Dr. Joel Parrott, President/CEO and head veterinarian of the Oakland Zoo.

Riding the gondola over the fields with camels on the left and bison on the right, we enjoyed strikingly beautiful views of the bay in idyllic weather departing atop the hill at the Landing Café. After a wine reception and delicious dinner at the Café, Dr. Parrott presented an update on how his vision for the zoo is coming to fruition.

Part of Dr. Parrott’s goal was to provide large, roaming areas for range animals and more space for the rest of the animals to enjoy foliage similar to their indigenous settings. With the recent expansion of the “California Trail” (native animals like the grizzly, wolves, jaguar and more), the Oakland Zoo is now equivalent in size to the San Diego Zoo.

The Oakland Zoo is managed by the Conservation Society of California (CSC); a non-profit organization leading an informed and inspired community to take action for wildlife locally and globally. The Zoo website cites Dr. Parrott’s achievements in his 3 decade tenure that “include an over-arching conservation focus for the Zoo, naturalistic and enlarged animal exhibits, increasing the size of the Zoo from 25 to 100 acres, the creation of the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children’s Zoo, a new state-of-the-art Leed-certified veterinary hospital, and the development and reality of the California Trail expansion. “ 1

As part of the Zoo’s preservation and re-population mission, The Oakland Zoo funded transport of a bison herd from Canada to the Blackfeet Indians in Montana. Working with the Blackfeet tribe in Montana, Dr. Parrott is helping to re-populate bison in America. At one time 30 million bison roamed the plains, providing the native population food & clothing, the animal’s spirits revered by the tribes who depended on them. 

After Westward expansion and wars in the 1860’s, the bison herd of 30 million was reduced to 800,000. 

In appreciation of the Zoo’s reputation for re-populating threatened species - the tribe graciously lent the Zoo 14 bison for breeding and return to the Blackfeet Tribe as part of their “Iinnii Initiative”: To restore free-roaming bison to increase the herd living in an open range setting on Blackfeet tribal land, Glacier National Park & Waterton National Park (Rocky Mountains area).

“To the Zoo’s surprise last year, the 14-member herd at Oakland Zoo’s California Trail grew to 24 within weeks of their arrival in April 2018. Many of the females that arrived from the Blackfeet Nation were in fact pregnant, and ten calves were born.

Eleven of the American Bison that arrived at Oakland Zoo in April 2018 were delivered back to the Blackfeet Nation in Montana. The offspring were driven back to the Blackfeet tribe in Montana by Dr. Parrott himself, for close veterinarian supervision.” 2

A few other accomplishments towards Dr. Parrott’s vision include:

  • In the past decade alone, through the Zoo’s conservation efforts, the Zoo has invested over $1,000,000 in contributions supporting partnering conservation organizations in saving animal species worldwide. 
  • The threatened condor population was down to only 22 birds until the zoo launched their conservation effort, bringing the population in California up to 400 this year.
  • Growing the number of zoo visitors to 940,000 per year. (That’s more than the Oakland Warriors!). Membership has flourished to reach 120,000
  • The zoo has played a role in re-introduction of wolves to California. The zoo’s mated pair just had 4 wolf pups born this year.

The Oakland Zoo can be contacted online with opportunities for donation, exploration, classes, camps, volunteering, conservation and education at: at: www.OaklandZoo.org., 9777 Golf Links Road, Oakland, CA 94605 (510) 632-9525

THANK YOU DR. JOEL PARROT, LANDING CAFÉ, CHANTAL BURNETT AND THE OAKLAND ZOO!

1 & 2  quotes from Oakland Zoo website

High Adventure returns to Elkhorn Slough (Moss Landing) for a kayaking adventure

  • Bob Barth

  • Mark Rosen plus "Go Sharks"

March 2019

What a tremedous day on the water 

 Baby Otters!  Baby Seals!

Kayaks were  rented at Kayak Connection at Moss landing  (see below) for members that did not have their own rquipment 

Elkhorn Slough:

http://www.elkhornslough.org/

Kayaks: $35 for single, $55 for double, $65 for triple

Our past trips have ranged from an hour and a half to 3 hours. This adventure will be in the 1.5 hour range.

Birthingof the Otter pups is always exciting...

But members did not overlook the Peliguins, whales off the beach, Otters, and  the pesky sea lions. 

Members were reminded that  each month and day on the slough is very different.

Meeting Schedule:

Join up at Kayak Connection between 8:30 A.M. prior to the store opening at  9:00 in Moss Landing to discuss Paddle

Plan ahead to rent a Kayak you need to call and make a reservation as kayaks are limited. If you call and there are no more kayaks reach out to  Montery Bay Kayak  located right next door. 

Kayak Rentals

Kayak Connection

phone: 831-724-5692
fax: 831-761-2379
moss@kayakconnection.com

Store Hours
Sat, Sunday: 9am-6pm

Lunch:

Afterwards we can have lunch at  Phil’s’ Fish Market.  If you haven’t been its an experience.

http://www.philsfishmarket.com/index.html

If you wish to attend please let Mark Rosen or Tom Limon know.

Have questions >>>. Just email me (mrosen@info-gate.com)

Matthew Yep, Interact Area 1 Director and Member of Alameda High School Interact

Rotary Teens Implement Solutions to Homelessness

A handful of teens from local Interact clubs launched “3 Rays of Hope” solutions to homelessness, a hot issue for Oakland and other East Bay leaders. Interact Area 1 Director, Matthew Yep, along with Aaron Chu (pictured here), and a group of Interact Rotarians , presented the results of their Under One Roof project to the Rotary Club of Oakland in August. Their small group of teens built a home and delivered self-care products to 200 homeless people in Oakland with hopes to inspire city leaders in their ongoing efforts to educate communities on this topic through discussion and a video.

WHAT IS INTERACT?

Interact is for youth ages 12-18 who want to connect with other young people to serve their communities. An Interact club is a school-based service club, sponsored by one or more local Rotary clubs. Interact clubs often join forces with other Interact clubs to expand their impact. 

Teresa Weyand of The Rotary Club of Oakland interviewed Interactors Matthew Yep and Aaron Chu from the Alameda High School Interact club, about their experience on this project, Under One Roof.

_________

Oakland Rotary: What did you learn? Where there any “aha” moments or personal epiphanies?

Interact: One of the “aha” moments was hearing the variation in stories about how each person became homeless. Seeing a video of a homeless person is not the same as actually meeting homeless people and recognizing their dignity as human beings.  We agreed that action was necessary to make a difference and feel that we accomplished that education and outreach. A house is so important – basic needs must be met before homeless individuals can attempt to look for a job or access resources. Another “aha” moment was seeing a home we built go to one homeless woman we met named Jude. It made a tangible difference in her life. She commented to us:

I had the wrong impression about homelessness. Before I was homeless, I used to think that if you just worked or got up off the sidewalk and went and got help, you’d be fine. But that just note the case. Not all homeless people are drunks or addicts, and a lot of people just don’t understand that. But it’s people like you and your organization that make this world a better place.

Oakland Rotary: Aaron, please elaborate on the “3 rays of hope” concept that evolved from this project.

Interact: The initial launch of the project involved Interact and adult Rotarians.  The first ray of hope was Breaking the Stigma of Homelessness and presenting homeless people as unique individuals, with unique stories.  We held benefit shows and dinners, and encouraged Interactors to give speeches and share what their firsthand experience with homeless people had taught them. 

The second ray of hope involved Preventing Homelessness. That action was building a house for Jude, a homeless woman, using upcycled wood.  The experience was invaluable because we actually got to know and spend time with Jude. We wanted to build the house well enough that someone else could use it when she no longer had a need.

The third ray of hope was Aid in Need, which was specific to Alameda High. We went through our homes and took unused, surplus toiletries and assembled care packages. 120 members collaborated with other schools and when the day of the project arrived, we had about 100 care packages to personally distribute to homeless people in our community. After distribution, when we resumed building, every nail in that house was pounded with purpose.

Oakland Rotary: Why do you feel this project was right for Interact?

Interact: As members of Interact we try to put the Rotary motto of “Service Above Self” into action. We take that to heart. We want to serve others. Homelessness and the problems surrounding it have been around longer than we have been alive, but San Francisco and Oakland have so many homeless people.  Our goal to help others was met through this project.

Oakland Rotary: Do you have any follow up plans?

We conduct a month of service in November where our school, Alameda High School, commits to one small project to work on for a whole month. Our plan is to follow up on this project by building a “coat drive” that we will use to help local homeless people.  

_________

At the Interact presentation, the Oakland Rotary Club congratulated the Interactors on their Under One Roof project. They successfully served the most disadvantaged members of their community, and worked to inspire others to renew efforts to push for real solutions to the homeless crisis.

For more information on Interact Clubs in general, visit www.rotary.org/en/get-involved/interact-clubs.

Committee: